What percentage of assigned offices and cubicles sit empty during a typical day?

Answer: According to a study done by Cisco … 60%.

That’s why companies like Accenture are going to “hoteling”, why more hotels are putting in business suites, and why Starbucks is adding conference rooms in some locations.

image

= = = = =
What are the bigger implications?
= = = = =


Excerpted from The Atlantic: The Next Workplace Revolution

The US Census Bureau reported that the number of Americans working from home soared 41 percent in the last decade, to 13.4 million.

That is,  9.5 percent of all workers work from home at least one day per week.

Workers have for many years arranged to do business at “third places.”

Now companies are formalizing the arrangement.

= = = = =

There’s a new trend in the workplace that seems poised to change corporate real estate: the rise of the mobile workforce.

They are deciding where and when to meet with clients or fellow workers, as it suits their schedules, and employers are letting them do so.

“Employees are leaving work to get work done, and technology lets them. They have a phone and connectivity, and they are decoupled from the desk.”

A growing number of employees don’t have the need to be in a cubicle at headquarters – but they are not staying at home, either.

Workers have for many years arranged to do business at “third places” like Starbucks amid nearly ubiquitous connectivity.

Now, companies are reducing and even eliminating assigned offices or cubicles, and renting space in hotels and underutilized office spaces as needed.

Accenture has moved 100 percent of its employees to this model, where workers book office space like booking a hotel room.

Hotel chains like Marriott are getting into the game … now, they are not just places to sleep, but to work, for professionals constantly on the go.

= = = = =
The exodus from the cubicle has been driven by worker productivity (e.g. reducing commuting time) and brick & mortar efficiency.

A study of corporate assets by Cisco showed that 60 percent of assigned desks or offices sit empty during the day.

The average square feet needed per employee has dropped from 250 twenty years ago to 150 today. It’s 100 square feet in some corporate offices.

= = = = =
The workforce itself is changing in composition and character.

A study by Intuit predicted that the number of “contingent” or freelance workers – those hired more on the consultant model for two days a week, for example, and who work for multiple masters – will rise from 20 million to 40 million by 2020.

So what does it all mean for the traditional corporate headquarters – and for cities?

the ideal location may change – favoring urban environments, with all their amenities and propinquity, over suburban office parks.

“The broad picture is you’re going to have a massive excess of office space outside that urban core.”

With so much of a backlog of workpace sitting idle, though, even within cities there may be much more consolidation, streamlining, and super-efficient adapative re-use of existing and obsolete buildings.

It remains to be seen whether the mobile workforce trend will really have a transforming impact on office real estate.

But for this piece of the rapidly changing workplace scenario, we are once again back to the future: cities re-imagining, reinventing, and re-using their assets.

* * * * *

One Response to “What percentage of assigned offices and cubicles sit empty during a typical day?”

  1. Ivan Says:

    >A study of corporate assets by Cisco showed that 60 percent of assigned desks or offices sit empty during the day.

    That’s why Cisco switched to “hot desking” a while back, going away from ” assigned offices and cubicles”.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s