Remember when the med-science community told young adults that the virus wouldn’t hurt them?

Apparently, that’s a bell that can’t be unrung … and young “invincibles” are driving current coronavirus case spikes
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There’s no denying that that confirmed Covid cases have bumped back up to prior peak levels … about 30.000 new cases per day.

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Digging a little deeper…

New cases have dropped from sky-high levels in the Northeast … and held relatively constant in the Midwest.

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But, cases have exploded in the West and the South

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Source: WSJ

One obvious point: hot weather doesn’t seem to kill off the virus.

And, there is some chatter that virus-spreading air conditioning systems may be spreading the virus (think: Legionnaires disease).

But, most determining,, there has been a huge shift in the demographic profile of the cases which suggests that young invincibles aren’t so invincible after all…

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The 65 and over crowd — which a couple of months ago accounted for about half the new cases (roughly 15,000 per day) — now account for about 5,000 new cases per day … and less than 20% of total new cases.

That’s good new since the over 65 death rate is multiples of that for other age groups.

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But, new cases among those 18 to 49 that account are rising … to over 16,000 per day … with that age group accounting for over half of the new daily cases.

So, what’s going on?

According to the WSJ:

Public-health experts attribute the rise in cases largely to people becoming more mobile, congregating in groups and dropping safety measures.

Many people appear to have embraced their usual summer rituals.

Health officials are sounding alarms about a surge in cases racing throughbars and house parties

In many areas (e.g. college towns) nightlife has returned to a pre-coronavirus status.

For example,, a popular bar near Michigan State University’s campus in East Lansing was site of a recent ‘super spreader’ event.  That single location has been reportedly linked directly to at least 85 confirmed COVID-19 cases in East Lansing and reported connected to a “cluster outbreak” of at least 30 more cases 100 miles away, triggered by one of the bars patrons. Source

The increasing infection rate among the 18 to 48  age group is both a blessing and a curse.

As the WSJ points out: “Because younger people are more likely to have better Covid-19 outcomes, the new surge in cases might not result in as many deaths as before.”

But, the more the virus spreads, the harder it is to keep from vulnerable populations.

As Arizona Gov. Ducey said:

I know many young people out there feel invincible but their parents and grandparents are not invincible.

That’s the curse part of the trend since:

A record 32 million American adults are now living with their parents or grandparents … up almost 10% from a year ago. Source

According to Zillow researchers, almost 3 million young adults moved back “home” in March and April, and the trend is continuing.

Said differently, the invincibles are potentially putting their nearest and dearest elders at risk.

Personally, I hope that they start thinking about that.

3 Responses to “Remember when the med-science community told young adults that the virus wouldn’t hurt them?”

  1. June 30: C-19 Key NATIONAL & STATES Data | The Homa Files Says:

    […] News & Views on Marketing, Economics & Politics « Remember when the med-science community told young adults that the virus wouldn’t hurt th… […]

  2. July 1: Key NATIONAL & STATES Data | The Homa Files Says:

    […] For details, see: Remember when the med-science community told young adults that the virus wouldn’t hurt them? […]

  3. July 2: C-19 Key NATIONAL & STATES Data | The Homa Files Says:

    […] For details, see: Remember when the med-science community told young adults that the virus wouldn’t hurt them? […]

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