Archive for the ‘Tuition & fees’ Category

Forget the $10,000, it’s Biden’s repayment plan that’s the killer.

August 31, 2022

Great analysis by William Gsldton  in today’s WSJ
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Galston writes:

A largely neglected dimension of Mr. Biden’s order changes to the program allowing borrowers to repay their loans as a percentage of their discretionary income over a fixed period (“income-directed repayment,” or IDR).

That provision might prove even more consequential (than the $10,000 loan forgiveness).

The president has:

  • Increased the amount of annual earnings not counted as discretionary income by about $30,000
  • Reduced monthly payments from 10% to 5% of what does count as discretionary income
  • For borrowers with original loan balances of $12,000 or less, Biden has reduced the repayment period from 20 years to 10
  • For borrowers whose payments are too small to cover interest as well as principal, the unpaid interest will no longer be added to the loan balance.
  • At the end of the 10 years, the loan balance is written off.

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The results will be dramatic.

The average starting salary for students with two years of community college is less than $35,000.

That means that loan payments will be based on only $5,000 of discretionary earnings.

So, the monthly payment is less than $25, including interest.

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So what?

“Through the back door, the president will come close to fulfilling his promise to make the first two years of community college free, and almost all borrowers in this category will be debt-free after 10 years.”

That may be a good thing, but…

The repayment plan applies to all students (current and future) with Federal loans,

Accordingly, the Penn-Wharton model suggests that this feature of the president’s program could cost as much as $450 billion over the next decade.

That’s more than the estimated cost of the $10,000 loan forgiveness … and raises the total cost of Biden’s program to a trillion dollars.

All with the stroke of a pen…

Ouch.

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Flashing back, Galston noted that his 1963 annual tuition at Cornell was $1,700 … and that students attending Ohio State were grousing about paying $375 annually.

What do colleges have in common with Kohl’s?

November 10, 2015

I oft say that anybody who pays sticker price at Kohl’s should look over their shoulder to make sure that Darwin isn’t chasing them.

Maybe the same should be said of parents who pay list price tuition to fund their kiddies through college.

Lots of talk re: how college costs are soaring.

According to the WSJ

Published tuition rates have soared in the last decade, but only a small percentage of families actually pays full freight.

Between grants to needy students and merit scholarships to entice other desirable candidates, schools these days are giving back nearly 50% of gross tuition revenue in the form of aid and awards.

In other words, list prices are going up, but more stuff is being sold at sale prices.

 

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Increasingly, colleges are using pricing methods previously the domain of airlines and discount retailers …

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College: Nobody pays retail anymore …

October 14, 2015

Lots of talk these days re: skyrocketing college tuition prices.

That’s certainly true of list prices, but these prices are becoming more and more like new car sticker prices – maybe even worse.

According to the latest annual studies done by NACUBO (National Association of College and University Business Officers), approximately 89 % of first-time, full-time freshmen at institutions surveyed received institutional grant aid.

English translation: in most cases, “institutional grant aid” is simply a discount from the tuition’s list price.

And, the discounts aren’t trivial amounts … they are approaching 50%.

Think, half-off sales at Kohl’s

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So, who is paying retail any more?

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What do colleges have in common with Kohl’s?

February 2, 2015

I oft say that anybody who pays sticker price at Kohl’s should look over their shoulder to make sure that Darwin isn’t chasing them.

Maybe the same should be said of parents who pay list price tuition to fund their kiddies through college.

Lots of talk re: how college costs are soaring.

According to the WSJ

Published tuition rates have soared in the last decade, but only a small percentage of families actually pays full freight.

Between grants to needy students and merit scholarships to entice other desirable candidates, schools these days are giving back nearly 50% of gross tuition revenue in the form of aid and awards.

In other words, list prices are going up, but more stuff is being sold at sale prices.

 

image

 

Increasingly, colleges are using pricing methods previously the domain of airlines and discount retailers …

(more…)

What do colleges have in common with Kohl’s?

October 14, 2014

I oft say that anybody who pays sticker price at Kohl’s should look over their shoulder to make sure that Darwin isn’t chasing them.

Maybe the same should be said of parents who pay list price tuition to fund their kiddies through college.

Lots of talk re: how college costs are soaring.

According to the WSJ

Published tuition rates have soared in the last decade, but only a small percentage of families actually pays full freight.

Between grants to needy students and merit scholarships to entice other desirable candidates, schools these days are giving back nearly 50% of gross tuition revenue in the form of aid and awards.

In other words, list prices are going up, but more stuff is being sold at sale prices.

 

image

 

Increasingly, colleges are using pricing methods previously the domain of airlines and discount retailers …

(more…)

What do colleges have in common with Kohl’s?

October 14, 2013

I oft say that anybody who pays sticker price at Kohl’s should look over their shoulder to make sure that Darwin isn’t chasing them.

Maybe the same should be said of parents who pay list price tuition to fund their kiddies through college.

Lots of talk re: how college costs are soaring.

According to the WSJ

Published tuition rates have soared in the last decade, but only a small percentage of families actually pays full freight.

Between grants to needy students and merit scholarships to entice other desirable candidates, schools these days are giving back nearly 50% of gross tuition revenue in the form of aid and awards.

In other words, list prices are going up, but more stuff is being sold at sale prices.

 

image

 

Increasingly, colleges are using pricing methods previously the domain of airlines and discount retailers …

(more…)

Gotcha: Schools copying airlines’ nickel & diming …

April 3, 2013

In recent years, airlines nave become masters at “unbundled pricing” … offering a low base fare and then charging more for bags, heavy bags, priority boarding,window seats, bad sandwiches, soft drinks, blankets and, of course, reservation changes.

According to CNN: Baggage fees alone generate more than $3.3 billion each year, and fees for reservation changes add almost $2.5 billion.

Annoying, for sure … but also a good source of revenue.

According to watchdog group ProPublica, colleges are starting to adopt the airlines’ pricing playbook.

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Specifically, ProPublica says that student fees have become a kind of “stealth, second tuition imposed on unsuspecting families.”

And though their names can border on the comical — i.e., the “student success fee” — there’s nothing funny about how they can add up.

Such fees are on the rise on many campuses.

Here are some specifics:

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$$$: Tuitions jump at public colleges

March 14, 2013

According to the WSJ

Tuition at public colleges jumped last year by a record amount.

The average amount that students at public colleges paid in tuition climbed 8.3% last year, the biggest jump on record.

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In some cases, state tuition has risen so much that costs approach what students might pay at a private college.

Tuition revenue accounted for a record 47% of educational funding at public colleges last year.

Rising tuition costs are “another example of the bind that public institutions are in,” said Sandy Baum, an economist at Skidmore College.

Unless we make public funding a higher priority, the funds are going to have to come from parents and students.”

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Ken’s Take:

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