Archive for the ‘Welfare’ Category

Nums: Who pays taxes? Who benefits?

April 15, 2015

Since it’s tax day, I thought I’d flashback to a drill down I did on the tax system —  who pays in, where does it go and who benefits …

In a prior post, we drilled down on taxes … or, as my Dem friends would say government “revenues”.

We posted that in 2012 Americans paid a tad over $5 trillion in taxes to the Feds, States and Local Governments.

Drilling down, the $5 trillion is split roughly 50%-30%-20% to the Feds, States and Locals, respectively. Note that the Federal portion is just under $2.5 trillion.

image

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If these are “revenues” there must be matching services provided, right?

I found a study by the non-partisan Tax Foundation that analyzes taxes paid and benefits received.

The study is old – using 2004 data – but, in my opinion is a good starting point to calibrate the answer.

(more…)

Nums: Who pays taxes? Who benefits?

April 17, 2014

Since it’s tax week, I thought I’d flashback to a drill down I did on the tax system —  who pays in, where does it go and who benefits …

In a prior post, we drilled down on taxes … or, as my Dem friends would say government “revenues”.

We posted that in 2012 Americans paid a tad over $5 trillion in taxes to the Feds, States and Local Governments.

Drilling down, the $5 trillion is split roughly 50%-30%-20% to the Feds, States and Locals, respectively. Note that the Federal portion is just under $2.5 trillion.

image

* * * * *
If these are “revenues” there must be matching services provided, right?

I found a study by the non-partisan Tax Foundation that analyzes taxes paid and benefits received.

The study is old – using 2004 data – but, in my opinion is a good starting point to calibrate the answer.

(more…)

Uh-oh: Where did the bombers get the money?

April 24, 2013

I’d been wondering – since there has been no mention of jobs – how the bomber brothers got the dough to (a) live (b) travel to Russia for 6 months and (c) construct weapons of mass destruction.

image

The older brother didn’t have a job and the younger one was a pot-smoking college student.

The Boston Herald has just surfaced one avenue: that they (and their parents) were on the government welfare dole … so, in effect, taxpayers were paying their way.

Hmmm.

That’s bad, but is welfare enough to fund a terror plot complete with trips to Russia?

Doubt it.

So where did the rest of the money come from.

DHS Chief Napolitano says there’s no way they got it from terrorist groups.

Oh really, Janet.

No way?

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Nums: Did Clinton really end welfare as we know it?

March 29, 2013

Surprised me, but the answer is yes.

But, there’s more to the story.

Clinton’s (and Gingrich’s) initiative to pare the welfare rolls cut the number of people on welfare from about 5 million to under 2 million.

Surprising to me, the number has held pretty constant for the past 15 years or so.

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As I said, there’s more to the story …

(more…)

Nums: Who pays taxes? Who benefits?

December 8, 2012

As loyal readers know, I’ve been trying to get my arms around this question.

In a prior post, we drilled down on taxes … or, as my Dem friends would say government “revenues”.

We posted that in 2012 Americans will pay a tad over $5 trillion in taxes to the Feds, States and Local Governments.

Drilling down, the $5 trillion is split roughly 50%-30%-20% to the Feds, States and Locals, respectively. Note that the Federal portion is just under $2.5 trillion.

image

* * * * *
If these are “revenues” there must be matching services provided, right?

I found a study by the non-partisan Tax Foundation that analyzes taxes paid and benefits received.

The study is old – using 2004 data – but, in my opinion is a good starting point to calibrate the answer.

(more…)

Welfare: How much has been spent since LBJ declared the war on poverty?

October 1, 2012

Answer: About $17 trillion … but, there’s much more to the story.

There has been so much talk about welfare recently that I did some digging … not to judge good or bad, simply to to get some facts.

You can draw your own conclusions …

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Overview

According to Congressional testimony given by the Heritage Foundation, “welfare” refers means-tested federal programs providing cash, food, housing, medical care, social services, training, and targeted education aid to poor and low income Americans.

Means-tested programs are anti-poverty programs: they are intended to increase the living standards of improve the capacity for self-support among the poor and near-poor.

Means-tested welfare spending or aid to the poor consists of government programs that provide assistance deliberately and exclusively to poor and lower-income people.

For example, food stamps, public housing, Medicaid, and Temporary Assistance to Needy Families are means-tested aid programs that provide benefits only to poor and lower-income persons.

Non-welfare programs provide government benefits and services for the general population — all income levels.

For example, Social Security, Medicare, police protection, and public education are not means-tested per se.

But, Social Security benefit pay-out rates are lower for higher income people and Medicare premiums are higher for higher income people

There are 69 means-tested welfare programs operated by the federal government:

  • 12 programs providing food aid;
  • 10 housing assistance programs;
  • 10 programs funding social services;
  • 9 educational assistance programs;
  • 8 programs providing cash assistance;
  • 8 vocational training programs;
  • 7 medical assistance programs;
  • 3 energy and utility assistance programs; and,
  • 2 child care and child development programs.

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Spending

Since the beginning of the War on Poverty, government has spent $15.9 trillion (in inflation-adjusted 2008 dollars) on means-tested welfare.

In FY2011, federal spending on means-tested welfare, plus state contributions to federal programs, were about $940 billion.

Combined federal and state means-tested welfare is now the second largest category of overall government spending in the nation.

Means-tested welfare is  exceeded only by the combined cost of Social Security and Medicare.

Welfare spending is greater than the cost of public education and is greater than spending on national defense.

Total means-tested spending in 2008 was $708 billion … about $7,700 to $17,100 in means-tested spending for each poor American (depending on the estimating method) … on average, around $30,000 to $33,000 for a family of four … with about 1/3 of the amount going to medical care.

In FY 2011, total means-tested spending going to families with children … was around $33,000 per low income family with children.

In recent years …

  • 52 percent of total means-tested spending went to medical care for poor and lower-income persons,
  • 37 percent was spent on cash, food, and housing aid.
  • 11 percent was spent on social services, training, child development, targeted federal education aid, and community development.

Roughly half of means-tested spending goes to disabled or elderly persons.

The other half goes to lower-income families with children, most of which are headed by single parents.

Most of these lower-income families have some earned income. Average earnings within the whole group are typically about $16,000 per year per family.

If average welfare aid and average earnings are combined, the total resources available come to between $40,000 and $46,000 for each lower-income family with children in the U.S. … about 15%  below the total population’s median household income.

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First, they’ll have to (bleep) in a bottle …

June 7, 2011

If Floridians want welfare, they’ve got to ditch drug use.

Florida Gov. Rick Scott signed a bill last week  that would require welfare recipients to take a mandatory drug test. 

Applicants for the federal Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program who test positive for illicit substances won’t be eligible for the funds for a year, or until they undergo treatment.

Those who fail a second time would be banned from receiving the funds for three years.

The logic: It will make sure taxpayers aren’t subsidizing drug use. 

The legislation instantly came under a barrage of criticism from the American Civil Liberties Union and several of the Sunshine State’s Democrats.

Their shout-outs: “unfair”, “invasion of privacy, “unconstitutional”. 

* * * * *

Great debate on the topic on one of the news talk shows:

Person A: We don’t want to subsidize drug use.

Person B: You got no right to tell me how to spend my money.

Person A; It isn’t YOUR money.

Person B: Yes it is !

Person A: Many employers require drug-testing

Person B: Welfare ain’t no job.

That debate pretty well sums up the issue …

Source article: Daily News