Posts Tagged ‘social media’

So much for the ‘wisdom of crowds” and friends’ recommendations … be careful who you ‘like’.

June 7, 2012

Punch line: Companies flock to social media, hoping that people will ‘like’ them and provide them with close-bud references.

Well, it didn’t take long for social network pool to start getting polluted.

Now, when you click that like icon, you may be signing up for spam or triggering a virus.

That might dampen some social media enthusiasm …

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Excerpted from Business Week

Two years ago, e-mail was the format of choice for spam peddling diets, sexual enhancement, and get-rich scams.

Better filters have since banished many of the unwanted missives from in-boxes.

Instead, scammers are turning to social media sites that are often poorly equipped to deal with the influx.

“Social spam can be a lot more effective than e-mail spam”

Spammers create as many as 40 percent of the accounts on social-media sites.

About 8 percent of messages sent via social pages are spam, approximately twice the volume of six months ago.

Spammers use the sharing features on social sites to spread their messages.

Click on a spammer’s link on Facebook (FB), and it may ask you to “like” or “share” a page, or to allow an app to gain access to your profile.

By clicking on a link, some users may unwittingly “like” the spam, a practice security experts call “likejacking.”

On Pinterest, spam often lurks in the embedded links attached to photos, making it tricky for users to spot.

Be careful who or what you ‘like’ …!

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Facebook’s 99 percent … they don’t interact.

February 7, 2012

Punch line: Ehrenberg-Bass Institute reports that only 1% of a brand’s Facebook fans actually engage with it – including likes, posts, comments, tags, and shares.

Is the FB effect over-rated or do consumers simply need more time to change their behavior?

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Excerpted from businessinsider.com, “Only 1% Of A Brand’s Facebook Fans Actually Engage With It Online

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… If 1 percent engagement sounds way too small to make Facebook brand pages worthwhile, Karen Nelson-Feld, a senior research associate for Ehrenberg-Bass, reminds us that brand pages are still relatively young.

“People need to understand what it can do for a brand and what it can’t do,” she said. “Facebook doesn’t really differ from mass media. It’s great to get decent reach, but to change the way people interact with a brand overnight is just unrealistic.”

Edit by KJM

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The bald, and the beautiful? Barbie could get a buzz cut …

January 30, 2012

Punch line: This is a classic story of the intersection of consumer driven insights, a strong cause, and the power of social media. 

Two mothers, whose daughters lost their hair due to cancer treatment, contacted Mattel to create a bald Barbie to serve as a role model for young children. 

After this initial request failed to gain traction with Mattel,  these mothers used the ultimate weapon – the F-bomb.  Facebook.  They created a fan page called ‘Beautiful and Bald Barbie’ and generated over 137,000 ‘likes.’ 

Now, Mattel is more actively addressing this idea.

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Excerpted from brandchannel.com “Mattel Doesn’t Say No to Bald Barbie

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Back in December, two moms whose daughters had lost their hair due to cancer treatment contacted Mattel, the makers of Barbie, to see if the company would be interested in producing a bald Barbie as a role model to their own and other young girls.

Mattel sent Jane Bingham and Beckie Sypin a stock letter saying that it “does not take unsolicited ideas from outside sources.”

Undeterred, the women put up a Facebook fan page entitled “Beautiful and Bald Barbie! Let’s see if we can get it made,” and it duly received more than 137,000 “likes.” As a result, Brand Republic reports that Mattel is now addressing the issue more directly.

“We are honored that Jane Bingham and Beckie Sypin believe that Barbie could be the face of such an important cause,” a spokesperson said, according to the site. “Mattel appreciates and respects the passion that has been built up for the request for a bald Barbie doll.”

Mattel isn’t committing to get a hairless Barbie onto production lines….

“The obvious thing to do would be to release a limited edition bald Barbie with a percentage of the proceeds going to charity,” said Robin Grant, managing director at the social-media agency We are Social. “Some companies have a fear of being seen to bow to consumer pressure – but corporate marketing teams must guard against being unchanging and monolithic.”

Edit by KJM

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